Posts Tagged With: Stephen King

Do Horror Writers Give Themselves Nightmares?

horror: hor-ror (noun)

  1.  An intense feeling of fear, shock, or disgust.
  2. A thing causing such a feeling.

spooky screaming faceDo you ever have nightmares after watching a horror flick or reading a horror novel? Maybe just a case of the heebie-jeebies? Do you find yourself making double sure all the doors are locked when you’re home alone at night? Do you check the closets and under the bed? For a split second before you turn on the light in a dark room, do you hesitate, afraid to reveal the monster that might be lurking?

Oh sure, some of you are saying “Suck it up, you big baby. Horror never gives me nightmares.”

To you I say, “You haven’t been working out your imagination enough.” Continue reading

Categories: Killer Thursdays | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

When is Giving Up a Good Thing?

Acrobat Squirrel Raids Bird Feeder

After 312456.2 attempts, Tito finally makes it to the bird feeder…almost.

Growing up, many of us were probably told “never give up.” We were probably surrounded with stories about people who refused to quit and achieved their dreams. Thomas Edison never let failure (after failure after failure) stop him from trying again until he  finally invented the long burning light bulb. Orville and Wilbur Wright never gave up on flying. Stephen King was rejected dozens of times by publishers but kept on writing. Nemo just kept swimming.

If you’re a writer, artist, actor, ec, these exhortations to “just keep trying” often alternate with not-so-subtle suggestions to “just keep trying” at something else, anything else…but that’s another story.

By the time you reach adulthood, these “never say die” ideas are probably deeply ingrained. You know perseverance tips the odds in your favor…the question is: what kind of perseverance? Continue reading

Categories: Tuesday Toss-Up | Tags: , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Got Apocalypse?

Apocalypse?I have, in the past, admitted a predilection for both disaster and horror flicks. And since a good many movies from either of those genres fall into the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic categories, it follows that I would also have a twisted obsession interest in apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic stories.

Just what is it about the apocalypse that makes (some of) our hearts go pitter patter?

I suspect it’s the same reason that disaster flicks and horror movies are so appealing. Giant odds and hope. Throw ordinary people into the worst possible situation and watch them rise to the occasion (or die trying).

And maybe we also love it because, on some level, we all worry about the end of everything. We wonder whether will survive. We wonder whether our loved ones will survive. And we hope there’s a hero inside of us instead of a monster. Continue reading

Categories: Parallel Tuesdays | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

The Get Tossed Mashup, Volume 1

As I sit here on this fine Tuesday, I realize it’s high time for another Tuesday Toss-Up Blog Mashup. However, since that’s a lot of “ups” in one title, I decree that the mashup will henceforth be called the Get Tossed Mashup.

So there.

Welcome to the first Get Tossed Mashup. I hope you’ll enjoy the following selections as much as I did…

Sometimes it’s “out of sight, out of mind” and sometimes it’s “absence makes the heart grow fonder.” But which is it when it’s your writing project that you’ve been away from? Natasha McNeely asks, “How Do You Return to a Project After a Break?

Writing an ensemble can sometimes feel like a case of too many cooks in the kitchen. Jen J. Danna takes a lesson from Joss Whedon and explains How to Write an Ensemble.

The world seems to move faster everyday…maybe too fast. In another Avengers-inspired piece, Marcy Kennedy asks us “Do We Need to be a Little More Old-Fashioned?”

The mighty Bearded One, Chuck Wendig, shares another of his stellar “25 Things” with us in 25 Ways to Earn Your Audience.

Got Dark Tower? Anthony R. Schultz reviews Wizard and Glass by Stephen King.

A great teacher can inspire us to reach for incredible heights. But every once in a (hopefully) rare while, there’s a teacher that makes us want to fake a fever to get out of school. Cynthia Herron shares a difficult experience with a difficult teacher and asks “Can Great Leadership be Faked?

What can humor do for readers? Margie Lawson guest posts at Jenny Hansen’s, telling us how Humor Hits Hook Readers.

Share the love: Do you have any favorite links or blog posts? Share them in the comments.

Categories: Tuesday Toss-Up | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

April-May Writing Challenge: First Impressions and Famous Last Words

keyboard ~ blurGreat opening lines draw us in, making it impossible for us to turn away and great last lines linger long, long after we’ve read the end. Two of my favorite first and last lines come from Stephen King’s work.

“The man in Black fled across the Desert, and the Gunslinger followed.”  The Gunslinger (1982). Ooh…I know I want to follow them both. Don’t you?

“lady fingers they taste like lady fingers.” Survivor Type (1982). That one even makes my husband shiver and he’s never read the story.

Your challenge, should you choose to accept it, is to write either the opening or closing lines of a story. Start us off with a bang or leave us begging for more. As usual, any genre will do and the word count limit is 100.

Here’s how it all works:

  • Prompt: Create the first or last line of a story.
  • Genre: Anything goes. Mystery, Western, romance, historical fiction, alternate history, steam punk, science fiction, horror, fantasy, slip-stream, or whatever.
  • Word count: 100 words.
  • How to share: You can put it up on your blog and link here or (if you don’t have a blog) you can email (sonia DOT m DOT writes AT gmail DOT com) it to me and I’ll put it in a post for you.
  • Time limit: From now until the next challenge is posted in June.
  • Prizes: No…no prizes. Just the reward of a story well written.

There were some fabulous stories for the March Writing Challenge. I’ll be updating this post with links to them all shortly. In the mean time, cruise on over and read them here (in the comments).

***

I’ll posting over at the Life List Club tomorrow. Come on by and say hello.

Image Attribution (In Order of Appearance):
keyboard ~ blur by striatic, on Flickr CC BY 2.0

Categories: Tuesday Toss-Up | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 45 Comments

Procrastination Nation

I sit down to write and the tiny procrastinators begin to march through my mind waving their tiny flags, each one marked with yet another way to procrastinate. Did I throw in that load of laundry? Did I check the library for overdue books? Did I write down the last book I read in my book journal? What was the last book I read anyway? Maybe I should go look at all the books I have stacked by the bed and see if I can figure it out. Is that the cat? Is he locked in the pantry again? No doubt trying to bust into the catnip. That’s a lot of frost on the lawn today. Maybe I should check the weather for today. Did I update that weather app on my phone? When was the last time I synced my phone? Is that how you spell “synced” or is there an “h” in there somewhere. Did I check my email? Maybe I should email my grandmother. Did my daughter email her cousin? I haven’t been on Facebook in forever. There’s probably a ton of messages for me…or maybe not. And then there’s that Twitter account I used only once. I hear everybody uses

Continue reading

Categories: Tuesday Toss-Up | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

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